Current & Upcoming

Thursday, December 1, 2022 at 6.00 pm
Austrian Cultural Forum London
28 Rutland Gate | London SW7 1PQ | United Kingdom

 

Lew Nussimbaum aka Essad Bey aka Kurban Said
Cosmopolitan – Wanderer between worlds – Jewish Muslim – Orientalist in Exile
Under the auspices of Rabbi Dr. Ismar Schorsch.

In his short life, the writer Lev Nussimbaum (1905 - 1942) came into contact with all the currents of the early 20th century: Communism, Fascism and National Socialism.
Fleeing from Baku before the October Revolution, he converted from Judaism to Islam in Berlin in 1922 and changed his name to Essad Bey. He soon began to write, especially for Willy Haas's Die literarische Welt. His first book, Oil and Blood in the Orient, immediately became a bestseller. In rapid succession he published thirteen more books, including biographies of Mohammed, Stalin, and Nicholas II. He fled from the Nazis to Vienna, and finally after the Anschluss to Italy, where he died of a rare disease in Positano in 1942.

 

Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leïtis reads from the phantastic works of Lew Nussimbaum

 

Presented by the Austrian Cultural Forum London
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive

Saturday, December 17, 2022 at 5.30 pm
Church of Maria Regina Martyrum

Heckerdamm 230 | 13627 Berlin | Germany

 

„Our Death must be a Beacon!“
Letters and Poems by Libertas Schulze-Boysen
under the patronage of H.R.H. Duchess Elizabeth in Bayern

80 years ago, Libertas Schulze-Boysen was executed in Plötzensee on December 22, 1942. Together with her husband Harro and the couple Arvid and Mildred Harnack, Libertas Schulze-Boysen formed the core of the resistance group "Rote Kapelle" (Red Orchestra). Women and men, young and old, Christians and Marxists, workers, intellectuals and artists came together here, united by their opposition to the Nazi regime. When the Gestapo discovered the group's activities in the summer of 1942, over 100 members were arrested within a few months. Over 50 of them were sentenced to death and executed.

After 1945, the history of the "Red Orchestra" was hotly disputed and was often misrepresented and truncated as pro-Soviet and communist. Only access to previously inaccessible materials in archives in Prague and Moscow from the beginning of the 1990s contributed to a differentiated presentation of the work of the Schulze-Boysen / Harnack resistance group.

Libertas Schulze-Boysen, née Haas-Heye, was arrested in Berlin on September 8, 1942. During the three months in prison, she wrote impressive poems that stand out from the childlike, sometimes naïve poems of the youthful Libertas by their seriousness and plain language. The poems, together with the letters to her mother, Countess Victoria zu Eulenburg, paint a picture of a 29-year-old woman who displayed incredible maturity, composure, and wisdom in the face of the overpowering Nazi apparatus and her certain death sentence. She was not a superhuman heroine, but a real person with struggles and weaknesses we all know from our own everyday lives. For this very reason, Libertas Schulze-Boysen's texts are a great testament to her deep humanity.


The well-known theater and TV actress Christine Ostermayer will read Libertas Schulze-Boysen’s texts.

Anna Viechtl, member of Zafraan Berlin and the Andromeda Mega Express Orchestra, plays the harp.

Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr

 

Presented by the Church of Maria Regina Martyum
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive

Monday, December 19, 2022 at 6.00 pm
Kulturvolk / Freie Volksbühne Berlin

Ruhrstraße 6 | 10709 Berlin | Germany

„We are aviators in the fog“
Erwin Piscator’s Letters from Exile

America offered Erwin Piscator and his persecuted friends and colleagues protection from the Nazis. But the foreign country presented great challenges to actors, writers, and directors. They had to find their way around in a new language and orient themselves in a cultural scene in which completely different priorities applied. The emigrants had to start from scratch.

Piscator's letters to other emigrants – Bertolt Brecht and Hanns Eisler, among others – and to his new U.S. contacts – such as Tennessee Williams and Dorothy Thompson – illustrate the hopes and setbacks of life in exile.

Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr

Gregorij H. von Leïtis reads selected letters by Erwin Piscator.

Presented by Kulturvolk / Freie Volksbühne Berlin e.V.
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive

For more info and tickets please click here.

Thursday, January 26, 2023 at 6.00 pm
Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania
Charitéstraße 9 | 10117 Berlin | Germany

 

Of Paradise and the End of the World
Literary collage of poems, prose texts, theater scenes and letters by Jura Soyfer
On the occasion of the International Holocaust Remembrance Day

The enormous political and economic problems of the 1930s led to an ever faster and greater radicalization of the political spectrum. The magnitude and urgency of the crises to be dealt with today - especially the explosive power brought about by rapid inflation in Europe and the U.S. - makes looking back at the 1930s so interesting and important, even though there is no repetition of history in the proper sense.

Despite sometimes gloomy overall analyses, Jura Soyfer always retained an optimistic and humane and loving view of the individual and humanity as a whole.

 

Jura Soyfer was born on December 8, 1912 in Kharkov (on the territory of today's Ukraine). He was a permanent contributor to the Wiener Arbeiter-Zeitung since the early 1930s. Most of his poems and articles were devoted to the struggle against fascism. Soyfer warned urgently against the danger of a new war. After the Social Democratic Party was banned in 1934, Jura Soyfer wrote for the underground theaters that were now emerging, such as the "Theater der 49." He was arrested in November 1937 and released in February 1938 during a general amnesty. With the “Anschluss” and the invasion of Austria by the German Nazis, the regime of terror began to rage there as well. Jura Soyfer was soon arrested and taken to Dachau. In 1938 he was transferred to Buchenwald. On February 16, 1939, at the age of 26, his life came to an end in this cruel hell of fascist barbarism.

 

Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr

Gregorij H. von Leïtis reads from the works of Jura Soyfer.

 

Presented by the Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania in Berlin
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive

Wednesday, February 1, 2023 at 7.00 pm
Austrian Cultural Forum London
28 Rutland Gate | London SW7 1PQ | United Kingdom

 

Lew Nussimbaum aka Essad Bey aka Kurban Said
Cosmopolitan – Wanderer between worlds – Jewish Muslim – Orientalist in Exile

In his short life, the writer Lev Nussimbaum (1905 - 1942) came into contact with all the currents of the early 20th century: Communism, Fascism and National Socialism.
Fleeing from Baku before the October Revolution, he converted from Judaism to Islam in Berlin in 1922 and changed his name to Essad Bey. He soon began to write, especially for Willy Haas's Die literarische Welt. His first book, Oil and Blood in the Orient, immediately became a bestseller. In rapid succession he published thirteen more books, including biographies of Mohammed, Stalin, and Nicholas II. He fled from the Nazis to Vienna, and finally after the Anschluss to Italy, where he died of a rare disease in Positano in 1942.

 

Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr
Gregorij H. von Leïtis reads from the phantastic works of Lew Nussimbaum.

 

Presented by the Austrian Cultural Forum London
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive

Thursday, February 16, 2023 at 7.00 pm

Church of St. Ursula
Kaiserplatz 1 | 80803 Munich | Germany

 

Of Paradise and the End of the World
Literary collage of poems, prose texts, theater scenes and letters by Jura Soyfer
On the occasion of the International Holocaust Remembrance Day

The enormous political and economic problems of the 1930s led to an ever faster and greater radicalization of the political spectrum. The magnitude and urgency of the crises to be dealt with today - especially the explosive power brought about by rapid inflation in Europe and the U.S. - makes looking back at the 1930s so interesting and important, even though there is no repetition of history in the proper sense.

Despite sometimes gloomy overall analyses, Jura Soyfer always retained an optimistic and humane and loving view of the individual and humanity as a whole.

 

Jura Soyfer was born on December 8, 1912 in Kharkov (on the territory of today's Ukraine). He was a permanent contributor to the Wiener Arbeiter-Zeitung since the early 1930s. Most of his poems and articles were devoted to the struggle against fascism. Soyfer warned urgently against the danger of a new war. After the Social Democratic Party was banned in 1934, Jura Soyfer wrote for the underground theaters that were now emerging, such as the "Theater der 49." He was arrested in November 1937 and released in February 1938 during a general amnesty. With the “Anschluss” and the invasion of Austria by the German Nazis, the regime of terror began to rage there as well. Jura Soyfer was soon arrested and taken to Dachau. In 1938 he was transferred to Buchenwald. On February 16, 1939, at the age of 26, his life came to an end in this cruel hell of fascist barbarism.

 

Concept & Introduction: Michael Lahr

Gregorij H. von Leïtis reads from the works of Jura Soyfer

 

Presented by the Church of St. Ursula Munich
in cooperation with Elysium – between two continents and The Lahr von Leitis Academy & Archive

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